Anti-Doping Information

Active BBU biathletes are required to comply with anti-doping rules, and cooperate with testing programme officers. The key motivation for compliance is zero-tolerance for carelessness. Pleading ignorance will be no defence in front of any anti-doping tribunal, because you are solely responsible for any banned substance found in your body. The consequences of breaking any anti-doping rules include receiving a ban from competing in biathlon, a sport that forms an important part of your life. Any ban would also affect your reputation amongst colleagues, employers, friends and clean competitors.

All competing BBU members need to be trained by UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) training staff or a trainer approved by UKAD. This training is usually delivered in two seminars, each lasting approximately two hours. In addition to this training, staying up to date has never been easier because information can be quickly viewed by downloading the UKAD App, available to download on both Android and Apple.
www.ukad.org.uk/athletes/100-me

Anti-Doping Governing Bodies and Rules

The leading authority is the World Anti-Doping Authority (WADA) which produces the World Anti-Doping Code (WADA Code). International sporting bodies, including the International Biathlon Union (IBU), are signatories to the WADA Code. WADA promotes collaboration across countries and aims to harmonise nationally-implemented rules as much as possible. UKAD implements the WADA Code through the UKAD Rules.

BBU biathletes need to be familiar with the UKAD Rules, located at www.ukad.org.uk/anti-doping-rules. Note that the UKAD Rules will change throughout 2020. This is because the WADA Code is being updated. Therefore, UKAD has to make corresponding changes to the UKAD Rules, which will be published on its website: www.ukad.org.uk

Most crucially, you need to know the UKAD 10 Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs). The 10 ADRVs are a vital summary of the broad range of situations that amount to anti-doping violations. Carefully read all the 10 ADRVs to assess your current actions and habits in the context of not only biathlon, but also your life generally. You can easily read and refresh your memory of the 10 ADRVs via the UKAD App.

Checking if a Substance or Method is Prohibited

The current WADA Prohibited List (effective from 1st January 2020) provides a detailed list of banned substances and methods. Visit www.wada-ama.org/what-is-prohibited However, please remember it may be updated throughout the year. If after checking the latest Prohibited List you are unable to reach a clear conclusion as to which substances or methods are banned, seek advice from the UKAD Science & Medicine testing team. Generally, UKAD endeavour to reply to emails marked “Urgent” within 24 hours. Send your email to substanceenquiry@ukad.org.uk

BBU biathletes need to be familiar with the UKAD Rules, located at www.ukad.org.uk/anti-doping-rules. Note that the UKAD Rules will change throughout 2020. This is because the WADA Code is being updated. Therefore, UKAD has to make corresponding changes to the UKAD Rules, which will be published on its website: www.ukad.org.uk

Most crucially, you need to know the UKAD 10 Anti-Doping Rule Violations (ADRVs). The 10 ADRVs are a vital summary of the broad range of situations that amount toanti-doping violations. Carefully read all the 10 ADRVs to assess your current actions and habits in the context of not only biathlon, but also your life generally. You can easily read and refresh your memory of the 10 ADRVs via the UKAD App.

Checking supplements

To check if a supplement contains a prohibited substance visit the Informed Sport website, www.informed-sport.com, and type in the specific brand, product or batch number.

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Applying for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE)

Sometimes a biathlete with a medical condition may need to use a prohibited substance or method. If this situation arises, you need to apply for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

The process of making a TUE application is quick and simple. First, before emailing a TUE application, visit the Global DRO website, www.globaldro.com, to check if any medications you are using are prohibited. Second, if the medication is prohibited, ask your doctor if there is an alternative permitted medication that can be prescribed. Third, if there is no alternative permitted medication, you need to submit a TUE application. The TUE application form can be downloaded from www.ukad.org.uk. Send your completed TUE application to tue@ukad.org.uk

Most TUE applications are made in advance of competitions. However, there is also the potential to make a retroactive application. A situation when you may have to make a retroactive application is on receiving emergency treatment.

Note that the TUE application form allows you to choose for any UKAD decision to be sent to you via email. Remember that a TUE application can take up to 30 days. Further, the TUE application maybe refused, so you need to plan ahead.

Sending ‘Whereabouts’ information

If you have been selected to be part of a Registered Testing Pool (RTP), you have to provide UKAD with ‘whereabouts’ information recording where you will be available for testing for one hour in each day. You submit your ‘whereabouts’ information each quarter via an online service called the Anti-Doping Administration & Management System (ADAMS). For more details, including an informative three minute YouTube video, visit www.wada-ama.org/en/what-we-do/adams

Reporting known or suspected doping

If you know or suspect doping is taking place, you can anonymously call 0800 032 2332. Alternatively, in confidence, you can email intelligence@ukad.org.uk. To understand more about reporting, there is a helpful summary about the UKAD Report Doping in Sport service at www.forms.theiline.co.uk/ukad

BBU Commitment to Clean Sport

The BBU is committed to Clean Sport. The BBU board continuously expands its knowledge on anti-doping. Further, the BBU annual report contains a section covering IBU anti-doping trends and our strategic measures to deter and prevent doping. If you want to read a clear and succinct general summary about Clean Sport see: www.ukad.org.uk/athletes/why-clean-sport